Humanist

Damn how I hate the titles on Upworthy. Most of the time I don’t click just because their titles are almost insulting.

I do not believe in God or any sort of higher cosmic power or karma. I joke about karma but I don’t believe it exists because what is it but a substitute for God or fate or blessing or whatever. I’d like to believe in people but most are intolerable but I believe in being a good person for the sake of it, not for the purpose of getting in to heaven or avoiding a worse fate than life on this planet because let’s face it, sometimes life can suck pretty hard.

Anyway, this.

Bigger and Better

2013 promises to be better than 2012. I am already happier and determined to be that way. It’s all about making the right changes. Involving more of the right people in my life and less of the wrong ones. Being more of the right kind of person in other people’s lives.

And trying really hard to get things done. Things have piled up and I have a large stack of things to get done. One task at a time.

Facebook is a Wasteland of Idiocy

I read this essay from Susan Klebold today.

In the wake of the recent school shooting tragedy, I want to know why people do horrible things to other people. I worry about video games and bullying. I want to be watchful and diligent. Her last paragraph really hit me:

I think I believed that if I loved someone as deeply as I loved him, I would know if he were in trouble. My maternal instincts would keep him safe. But I didn’t know. And my instincts weren’t enough.

I have known someone who committed suicide. I remember him saying that one of the things that kept him from doing it many times before was how much it would hurt his mother. In the end, that couldn’t save him.

We all want to point to someone or something that causes people to behave in ways we can’t fathom. They were bullied or mistreated or misunderstood or unloved or their parents didn’t teach them wrong from right. Prayer in schools, belief in God, abortion, access to assault rifles, et al are just bullshit agenda reactions.

I could be Susan Klebold or Nancy Lanza. Anyone can.

My kids did not hear about the school shooting. The school did not talk about it. We don’t watch the news or get the newspaper. I didn’t mention it to them. I hinted around trying to see if they heard anything to see if I needed to address it with them and they had not. I am grateful that the school didn’t address it with the students (they sent a letter home to parents), that my children remain unaware of it. Not because I didn’t have to talk about it with them, but because I feel they don’t need to know, they don’t need to fear for their own safety or be concerned at their age about this kind of thing.